Questions and Answers

Often asked questions

Why choose TPP training?

How does The Pilates Process approach differ from traditional Pilates methods?

What is core stability?

Is core strength the same thing as abdominal strength?

How does poor core stability relate to back pain?

What is ideal spinal alignment?

How does poor posture relate to back pain?




Why choose TPP training?

  • Small class sizes: We are detail oriented and limit class sizes to 12 students so that everyone gets the assistance they need. In fact we add an assistant when the class is more than 8 students.

  • Commitment to students: We really want you to understand the material, not just memorize it and we have developed creative, diverse methods of teaching to ensure just that.

  • Exceptional teachers: We have extremely high standards for teacher trainers. All of our course teachers have extensive and diverse teaching experience and are passionate about Pilates, their work and their students.

  • Therapeutic Pilates: Understandably, not every fitness teacher wants to teach therapeutically. It is a reality however, that every teacher will come across clients with pain and injury whether they plan to or not. Our training is infused with our therapeutic knowledge so that you will feel prepared and confident when those situations arise. Furthermore, if you do want to pursue therapeutic teaching you will be very well prepared to do so.




How does The Pilates Process approach differ from traditional Pilates methods?

There are two key defining elements to all TPP training: adaptability to evolving research and an emphasis on "how" to teach rather than just "what" to teach. Core stability research can be incorporated to some degree in all training, even the most basic mat courses. It affects how we cue, program and adapt. We teach instructors the reasons behind the method so that they can make educated teaching decisions and logical choices rather than simply repeating information. The emphasis on how to teach is fundamental. There are numerous ways to communicate information and we want our instructors to observe and adapt to how the clients learn. Assisted practice on non-Pilates students is a key element of TPP training




What is core stability?

Core stability, often referred to as core strength, refers to the activation of the deeper muscles in the body that control posture and alignment. Generally these core stabilizing muscles are responsible for controlling and supporting the joints rather than for creating movement. They help prevent joint compression and excessive strain on the spine.




Is core strength the same thing as abdominal strength?

Not exactly. First of all, core muscles are throughout the body, not just the abdominals. Core stability muscles work differently from the more surface or phasic muscles. The core muslces are designed for endurance rather than strength and work on a subconscious level to control joint movement and protect structures. The firing pattern, or sequence inwhich muscles activate is a crucial element to good function.




How does poor core stability relate to back pain?

If there is dysfunction in how these core stability muscles function, than the phasic or more surface muscles will grip in an effort to stabilize. These phasic muscles can be very strong and developed, but cannot do the job of the core muscles.




What is ideal spinal alignment?

We are not all meant to be identical, but there are guidelines as to what is ideal. The spine is not designed to be flat. There are three “neutral” curves that should exist to put the spine in a more shock absorbant alignment putting the least amount of stress on discs and other spinal structures. When this alignment is compromised it puts the joints at risk of compression and breakdown. Ideal alignment allows for forces to be distributed evenly.




How does poor posture relate to back pain?

Poor posture creates imbalance in the body and stresses joints by transmitting forces unevenly. In other words, when good alignment is not maintained certain structures and muscles have to take the bulk of the strain and tend to overwork and breakdown.